Invited artists include

CLAIRE CURNEEN (Ireland/Wales)

Claire Curneen's figurative ceramics command a quiet yet charged presence. The figurative pieces often refer to images of Christian Iconography, quoting narratives, which hold much relevance today.

The figures encompass elements of human experiences: love, loss, suffering and compassion. Yet they always embody hope. She uses porcelain for its delicacy, translucent quality and its ability to play with light like no other material. The textural finish is central to their making with dripping dribbles of glaze and gold accentuating the rich quality of the porcelain.

KYUNG-OK YOO (Korea)

YOO Kyung-ok feels curiosity about the features of each individual such as his or her outer appearance, facial expressions, and linguistic behaviors. Her work derives the subtle difference in values between “I as a member of society wearing a social mask” and “I as an individual namely defined as confusion in self-identity.”

Girl dolls with the artist’s face either remain isolated or belong to a community. Those parts of a community appear to be playing a group game while the dolls that remain alone appear comfortable and have time to self-reflect while looking into a mirror. The artist observes herself from the viewpoint of the viewer, thereby coming to understand herself. She has recently extended the territory of her work to include observing individuals she has met. Her pieces are produced based on the features of these figures who have become the protagonists of her narrative.

She ensures the existence of a girl and the artist herself as a social member by displaying these girl effigies as if they were on a theatrical stage. She reminds viewers of their individual experiences and provides them with an opportunity to feel sympathy and solace and ponder over themselves.

GESZLER MÁRIA (Hungary)

Portraits - china portraits - as my diaries - for decades I have experimented to express my own personality in simple, concentrated "minimal art" form and with glowing contents (Poetry of industrial landscape, Rousseau's garden, Lonely bank, Blue bush etc).
These figures I imagine living in the landscape, hiding in a bush, lying in the grass, standing in water. In the exhibition hall, on plinths, I see a dissonant phenomenon. A new formal problem started to excite me - the contradiction of hard and soft, natural and constructed.
And referring to the contents: the unrevelling cloudy ideas.

How to create an object out of sculpture born within us? How had these happened before? Michelangelo went to Carrara and was standing in the quarry in the glowing heat - finally he pointed at the marble rock at the side of the mountain and said "that's my David".
He implanted his perfect vision of David into the marble rock or otherwise the white gleaming marble formed Michelangelo's spirit?

Thus I feel my way towards the surrealistic transformation of stones and statues, china stones, not heavier than some grams, egg-shell white with silkscreen pictures. But what kind of pictures?

JAMES TISDALE (USA)

James’ personal iconography is rich with references to the cultural, social, political and religious experiences of growing up in Mississippi. His outlook is humorous, poignant, and sometimes confrontational, as he observes the world around him. The work draws upon both the beauty and the ugliness of this region. His works explore the concepts of what society ordains as acceptable or beautiful, as well as, what it condemns as being ugly and undesirable. Having grown up in the south, he discovered that many situations, events and people are a mixture of both definitions. For him, the intrigue lies not only within the borders of these interpretations but also in how these labels can influence a lifelong attitude.

While James is influenced by all that he sees and hears, his historical art influences range widely from the figurative art works of the Renaissance, to the personally powerful folk art of the south.

James’ pieces are constructed using various methods with a heavy grog white clay body. Once the form is established, the surface is then finished with several layers of underglazes, stains, and glazes. With each added layer, the work is subjected to another firing. This process of layering colorants is used to add depth to the surface and a look of distress to the piece.

artist website: www.jamestisdale.com
Ceramics Monthly article: "Southern Gothic"

 

FEKETE LASZLÓ (Hungary)

As was the tradition amongst artists during the communist era, Fekete focused mainly on international juried exhibitions winning a slew of medals, prizes and diplomas for his work from the Hungarian Cultural Ministry, the French Cultural Ministry, the Mino Triennial and the Academy of International Ceramics.

Since 1994 Fekete has exhibited widely. His work takes on grand themes, drawn from the layered cultural detritus over five hundred years of successive regimes in Hungary, each of which has attempted to wipe out the traces of the previous power. In some of his work he collaborates with the Herend Porcelain factory, using their seconds to assemble sardonic commentaries on taste and culture.

Museum collections include Mint Museum of Craft and Design, Budapest Museum of Decorative Art, Carnegie Museum of Art, Gardiner Museum of Art, Museum of Arts and Design, Ceramic Research Center at Arizona State University and the Princesshof Museum

 

KECSKEMÉTI SÁNDOR (Hungary)

The word ‘sculpture’ has an antique meaning: make God or a thing what God pleases. To find the inner sphere of the body: this is the essence of modern sculpture. Sculpture is like music. There are many people not understanding contemporary music, but in the future everybody can understand it.

Having learnt the potters' craft he took his diploma at the Hungarian Academy of Craft and Design in 1972, where he was a pupil of the influential Arpad Csekovsky. Since 1972 he has been a freelance artist while also teaching in the Masterschool of the Academy between 1987 and 1994. Between 1990 and 1993 he collaborated with German architect Egon Kunz making ceramic architectural elements in the town of Gundremmingen, Germany. He now lives and works alternatively between Germany and Hungary.

His works are characterised by an architectonic approach with sculptural concepts and monumentality. Besdies ceramicand porcelain he also works in stone, bronze and wood.

 

F. OROSZ SÁRA (Hungary)

She graduated from the Hungarian Academy of Applied Arts in 1988 and took her masters in 1990. In 2010 she received her DLA at the Moholy Nagy University of Art and Design with her subject being "Theorical Questions of Applied Art. There is the Ancient Art which can be seen in Contemporary Arts". Since 2010 she been teaching as a senior lecturer at the Szent István University, Gödöllő. Since 2015 she is researching at the Hungarian Academy of Arts Research Institute of Art Theory and Methodology.

She has won numerous scholarships and attended many symposia and mastercourses. She has been a prizewinner at the International Biennale of Carouge (Switzerland).

She is a member of Association of Hungarian Fine and Applied Artists, The Applied Arts Workshop of Gödöllő, Society of Hungarian Ceramists, Association of Hungarian Artists and the ALTAMIRA Group of Fine Artists

 

FUSZ GYÖRGY (Hungary)

The hub of György fusz's figurative sculpture is the vibrating tension between meditative introspection and powerful expression. With a presence that can be felt and a wakeful spirit, the artist accepts responsibility for his inner and external observations and transmits them in such a way that they awaken and provoke further thoughts.

Though the number and variety of human gestures are limitless, Fusz made the decision to make sculptures that would give him more freedom in the shaping of the exciting variations if the human body, which he has yet to exhaust. It is the soul that interests him not the situation.

 

 


Information and application form
please email:
Steve Mattison, International Contact
icshu@me.com

informátió:
Andrea Kocsiné Havasi,
Magyar kapcsolat
Ha magyar nyelven kíván emailt küldeni, cimezze
icshu@t-online.hu

 


Claire Curneen


Claire Curneen


Kyungok Yoo


Kyungok Yoo

 


Geszler Mária


Geszler Mária


James Tisdale


James Tisdale


James Tisdale


Fekete Laszló


Fekete Laszló


Kecskeméti Sándor


Kecskeméti Sándor


F. Orosz Sára


F. Orosz Sára


Fusz György


Fusz György


Fusz György

 
© International Ceramic Studio, H-6000 Kecskemét, Kápolna u. 11, Hungary