Invited artists include

GREG DALY (Australia)

The first and last light of the day, light through cloud, light behind cloud, light defused by rain and storm. The moment just after sunset when the land glows for a short while. These are the moments I look for and it is the nature of lustre to capture these. Daly's work is dazzling in its intensity.

Lustreware, once associated with alchemy for its golden effects, may no longer be a guarded secret of potters and tillers, but the technique still intimidates many artists. The challenging mix of science and art requires a great deal of experimentation to achieve the desired results. Perfecting lustre demands patience, experience, and, above all, knowledge. Yet the iridescent beauty of this decorative technique makes it all worthwhile. Lustre takes on many appearances, from a warm coppery glow to a spectacular prismatic finish.

Greg Daly is internationally known and respected as a ceramic artist specialising in rich glaze effects, and also as the author of Glazes and Glazing Techniques (1995 Simon & Schuster). His work is represented in 24 international book publications, in 80 national and international art galleries and museums (including the National Gallery of Australia and the Victoria & Albert Museum, London), and he has won 36 national and international awards.He has held over 70 solo exhibitions and was President of Craft Australia from 1992-1995. He has exhibited in over 200 international and national group exhibitions. In 1999 he received an ARC grant to research the effect of firing cycles in the development of copper red glazes.

Greg Daly is also teaching one of our Masterclasses on Lustre Glazing Techniques 17 - 21 October, 2016. See information here

 

VELIMIR VUKICEVIC (Serbia)

Velimir Vukičević is perhaps best known for his geometrical and trompe-l’oeil porcelain pieces.

Respecting the tradition and culture of the past, I am trying to think about and strive towards the adventure of the future. I wish to believe that the dynamic development of human civilization and ceramics as its integral part will not abandon individuality, creativity, imagination, emotion, or the feeling for clay. Those qualities are of great importance for me and my work.The fantastic process of materializing the idea through final realization always fascinated me and pushed to be curious and to go on. For some time now the pictorial problem I have bean trying to solve is to unify and harmonize form with painting, treating its surface with illusionistic images. Beside the sculptural objects I enjoy painting porcelain plates or charges with three dimensional drawings. This approach asks rational advance planing and concentration.Ceramic objects that I make examine our perception and pose unsolvable riddles: is that what we see a reality or just skillful illusion?

The fantastic process of materializing the idea through a final work always fascinated me and pushed me to be curious and to go on.

I enjoy to play with our perception, pose absurd riddles. Is that what we see or is it skillful illusion?

During my long practice I have discovered that many ceramic procedures that may be considered as technological mistakes can be utilized and become a part of personal approach and practice. He is a professor of sculpture in the ceramics department at the Faculty of Applied Arts in Belgrade.

 

ANTAL ANDRÁS (Hungary)

The intricate designs on Andras Antal's plates and panels are developed from series of small drawings in his sketchbooks. The selected images are usually re-drawn and enlarged before tracing them on to sheets of linoleum. The images and linear elements are carved into the linoleum surface with gouges in the same way as a printmaker cuts his image into a lino-block. The image is then pressed into soft, hand-rolled clay sheets. Following fast bisque firing to 1000[degrees]c the impressed clay surfaces are glazed in areas creating contrasting areas of colour and smoked unglazed graphic lines.

Alongside his portraits and larger graphic works, he also produces smaller tiles in series which are then assembled and arranged into juxtaposed designs, creating new and complex patterns. His finely executed decorative plates are all fired using the raku technique, for which the artist has developed and built his own style of small, horizontal, sliding roof electric kilns.

 

OMUR TÖKGÖZ (Turkey)

'Being as beautiful as the 14th day of the moon’ is an expression used in Turkish to describe beauty. With this expression, the full moon is associated with a bright and restful face. The light of the full moon emerging in the sky on a cloudless night is fascinating for many people. The moon openhandedly sends the light it receives from the sun, as if it is a gift. Although we are aware that the light does not originate from the moon itself, when watching it we attribute the light to the moon and admire it. The burrowed light has a quite modest and peaceful level and whiteness. The light of the moon softly covers the nature it illuminates, as a white veil.

Ömür Tokgöz Graduated from Ege University, Faculty of Textile Engeneering in 1988. She worked as a textile engineer until 2003 when she started working with ceramics in M. Tüzüm Kızılcan’s ceramic studio. She established her own studio in 2006 and she has been making experimental studies in porcelain since then.

She has work in many international collections including Westerwald Keramikmuseum, Germany, Patronat Municipal del Serveis Culturals of El Vendtell, Spain, FULE International Ceramic Art Museums (FLICAM) China, Zibo Ceramic Museum, Zibo, China, Museum of Modern Ceramic Art, Gifu, Japan, Yingge Ceramics Museum, New Taipei City, Taiwan

 

RUZICSKA TÜNDE (Hungary)

 

KONTOR ENIKŐ (Hungary)

 

HÁRI ANDREA (Hungary)

Andrea Hári started in 2011 to work with ceramics, and in 2014 ceramic design master's degree program at the University of Pécs.

During her university studies she began to work with combinations of concrete and porcelain parts in her work. Usinfóg recognisable basic forms, these mixed media pieces became stacked or series constructions with coloured themes and small additions. Her work is developing into groups of functional related objects using elements of cast coloured concrete contracting with the pure whiteness of porcelain.

 

 

Information and application form
please email:
Steve Mattison, International Contact
icshu@me.com

informátió:
Andrea Kocsiné Havasi,
Magyar kapcsolat
Ha magyar nyelven kíván emailt küldeni, cimezze
icshu@t-online.hu

 


Greg Daly


Greg Daly


Greg Daly


Velimir Vukicevic


Velimier Vukicevic


Velimir Vukicevic


Antal András


Antal András


Omur Tökgöz


Omur Tökgöz


Omur Tökgöz


Ruzicska Tünde


Ruzicska Tünde


Kontor Enikő


Kontor Enikő


Hári Andrea


Hári Andrea


Hári Andrea

 
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